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  • UK and Brexit – what now for EEA nationals in the UK

    By MediVisas on July 4, 2016 in Uncategorized
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    A brief guide Now the UK has voted to leave the EU, this means that once they actually do, EEA nationals in the UK will no long have the same rights of free movement of labour that they do now. It is important to note two things: First, that no changes are imminent, and that the UK is likely to

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  • Brexit: What the EU referendum means for European nationals living in the UK

    By MediVisas on March 23, 2016 in Uncategorized
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    Are you a EEA national living in the UK?  Are you concerned that the UK may vote to leave the EU, and worried about the impact this may have on you?  If so, this short article is for you. As we all know, on 23rd June 2016, British and Irish nationals living in the UK will take to the polls

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  • Immigration in Computer Weekly

    By MediVisas on November 27, 2015 in Uncategorized
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    “There are fewer applications for IT professionals to work in the UK than there were 20 years ago – as many larger companies outsource – but UK industry’s increased need for cyber security professionals will not benefit from these changes.” Please, check out the article in ComputerWeekly.com to read Vicky’s input… UK immigration rules fly in the face of cyber

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  • Immigration in the News

    By MediVisas on November 10, 2015 in Uncategorized
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    Last Tuesday evening, I was asked to appear on to BBC South Today to talk about the problems with getting spouse visas. The programme focused on a couple who live in Southampton with their two children. The husband is British and the wife Japanese, and she has been refused leave to remain in the UK. Although this couple are not

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  • Immigration in the 2015 General Election – An Analysis

    By MediVisas on April 17, 2015 in Uncategorized
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    Conservative Party It’s clear that Immigration is going to be a big issues for the Conservative Party judging by the volume of legislation they are proposing. As with UKIP, their aim is to have migration in the ‘tens of thousands’, ie less than 100,000 per year.  This, along with most of the EU directed policies, simply aren’t possible without renegotiation

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